Temperature Dependent Growth and Mortality of Agrotis segetum

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Standard

Temperature Dependent Growth and Mortality of Agrotis segetum. / Esbjerg, Peter; Sigsgaard, Lene.

In: Insects, Vol. 10, No. 1, 7, 06.01.2019, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Esbjerg, P & Sigsgaard, L 2019, 'Temperature Dependent Growth and Mortality of Agrotis segetum', Insects, vol. 10, no. 1, 7, pp. 1-15. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10010007

APA

Esbjerg, P., & Sigsgaard, L. (2019). Temperature Dependent Growth and Mortality of Agrotis segetum. Insects, 10(1), 1-15. [7]. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10010007

Vancouver

Esbjerg P, Sigsgaard L. Temperature Dependent Growth and Mortality of Agrotis segetum. Insects. 2019 Jan 6;10(1):1-15. 7. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10010007

Author

Esbjerg, Peter ; Sigsgaard, Lene. / Temperature Dependent Growth and Mortality of Agrotis segetum. In: Insects. 2019 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 1-15.

Bibtex

@article{ed848a31ad1348a7be78e0e149a2091b,
title = "Temperature Dependent Growth and Mortality of Agrotis segetum",
abstract = "From 1905 to present, cutworm outbreaks have caused substantial yield losses in North Western (NW) Europe. Early authors pointed to dry summers as the trigger; around 1980, the explanation was improved via modelling of historical data. The number of precipitation days and the July temperature proved to be important, and in experiments, moist soil caused considerable mortality. This information was used in preliminary forecasting with pheromone trap catches as biofix for estimations of occurrence and survival. As more precise information on temperature effects on growth and survival was needed, we performed experiments on growth and mortality effects on egg, all larval instars and pupae. We found clear positive relations between temperatures below 35 °C and development rates of eggs, all larval instars and pupae. Mortality was also affected, and low temperature caused pronounced mortality of young larvae. The severe mortality under cold, moist conditions versus high survival under warm, dry conditions may explain both the lack of relation between captures and injuries and the pronounced fluctuations of cutworm attacks in NW Europe reported from 1905 to present. These variations are likely to increase with the climate change and suggest a reanalysis of data on trap capture and injuries to improve decision support and sustainability in Integrated Pest Management.",
keywords = "Faculty of Science, forecasting, decision support, cutworm attacks, population fluctuations, fecundity, humidity",
author = "Peter Esbjerg and Lene Sigsgaard",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "6",
doi = "10.3390/insects10010007",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "1--15",
journal = "Insects",
issn = "2075-4450",
publisher = "M D P I AG",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Temperature Dependent Growth and Mortality of Agrotis segetum

AU - Esbjerg, Peter

AU - Sigsgaard, Lene

PY - 2019/1/6

Y1 - 2019/1/6

N2 - From 1905 to present, cutworm outbreaks have caused substantial yield losses in North Western (NW) Europe. Early authors pointed to dry summers as the trigger; around 1980, the explanation was improved via modelling of historical data. The number of precipitation days and the July temperature proved to be important, and in experiments, moist soil caused considerable mortality. This information was used in preliminary forecasting with pheromone trap catches as biofix for estimations of occurrence and survival. As more precise information on temperature effects on growth and survival was needed, we performed experiments on growth and mortality effects on egg, all larval instars and pupae. We found clear positive relations between temperatures below 35 °C and development rates of eggs, all larval instars and pupae. Mortality was also affected, and low temperature caused pronounced mortality of young larvae. The severe mortality under cold, moist conditions versus high survival under warm, dry conditions may explain both the lack of relation between captures and injuries and the pronounced fluctuations of cutworm attacks in NW Europe reported from 1905 to present. These variations are likely to increase with the climate change and suggest a reanalysis of data on trap capture and injuries to improve decision support and sustainability in Integrated Pest Management.

AB - From 1905 to present, cutworm outbreaks have caused substantial yield losses in North Western (NW) Europe. Early authors pointed to dry summers as the trigger; around 1980, the explanation was improved via modelling of historical data. The number of precipitation days and the July temperature proved to be important, and in experiments, moist soil caused considerable mortality. This information was used in preliminary forecasting with pheromone trap catches as biofix for estimations of occurrence and survival. As more precise information on temperature effects on growth and survival was needed, we performed experiments on growth and mortality effects on egg, all larval instars and pupae. We found clear positive relations between temperatures below 35 °C and development rates of eggs, all larval instars and pupae. Mortality was also affected, and low temperature caused pronounced mortality of young larvae. The severe mortality under cold, moist conditions versus high survival under warm, dry conditions may explain both the lack of relation between captures and injuries and the pronounced fluctuations of cutworm attacks in NW Europe reported from 1905 to present. These variations are likely to increase with the climate change and suggest a reanalysis of data on trap capture and injuries to improve decision support and sustainability in Integrated Pest Management.

KW - Faculty of Science

KW - forecasting

KW - decision support

KW - cutworm attacks

KW - population fluctuations

KW - fecundity

KW - humidity

U2 - 10.3390/insects10010007

DO - 10.3390/insects10010007

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30621348

VL - 10

SP - 1

EP - 15

JO - Insects

JF - Insects

SN - 2075-4450

IS - 1

M1 - 7

ER -

ID: 213672245