Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. / Smith, Ida Mosbech; Baker, A; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene.

In: Letters in Applied Microbiology, Vol. 61, No. 5, 2015, p. 491-497.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Smith, IM, Baker, A, Arneborg, N & Jespersen, L 2015, 'Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium', Letters in Applied Microbiology, vol. 61, no. 5, pp. 491-497. https://doi.org/10.1111/lam.12481

APA

Smith, I. M., Baker, A., Arneborg, N., & Jespersen, L. (2015). Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Letters in Applied Microbiology, 61(5), 491-497. https://doi.org/10.1111/lam.12481

Vancouver

Smith IM, Baker A, Arneborg N, Jespersen L. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Letters in Applied Microbiology. 2015;61(5):491-497. https://doi.org/10.1111/lam.12481

Author

Smith, Ida Mosbech ; Baker, A ; Arneborg, Nils ; Jespersen, Lene. / Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. In: Letters in Applied Microbiology. 2015 ; Vol. 61, No. 5. pp. 491-497.

Bibtex

@article{18f0f5951fe44919a1d86ebf395b038a,
title = "Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium",
abstract = "UNLABELLED: The human gastrointestinal epithelium makes up the largest barrier separating the body from the external environment. Whereas invasive pathogens cause epithelial barrier disruption, probiotic micro-organisms modulate tight junction regulation and improve epithelial barrier function. In addition, probiotic strains may be able to reduce epithelial barrier disruption caused by pathogenic species. The aim of this study was to explore non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Benchmarking against established probiotic strains, we evaluated the ability of four nonpathogenic yeast species to modulate transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) across a monolayer of differentiated human colonocytes (Caco-2 cells). Further, we assessed yeast modulation of a Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier function insult. Our findings demonstrate distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function. While the established probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii increased TER across a Caco-2 monolayer by 30{\%}, Kluyveromyces marxianus exhibited significantly stronger properties of TER enhancement (50{\%} TER increase). In addition, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify K. marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion.SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: This study demonstrates distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Further, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify Kluyveromyces marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. This study is the first to demonstrate significant non-Saccharomyces yeast-mediated epithelial cell barrier protection from Salmonella invasion, thus encouraging future efforts aimed at confirming the observed effects in vivo and driving further strain development towards novel yeast probiotics.",
author = "Smith, {Ida Mosbech} and A Baker and Nils Arneborg and Lene Jespersen",
note = "{\circledC} 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1111/lam.12481",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "491--497",
journal = "Letters in Applied Microbiology",
issn = "0266-8254",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium

AU - Smith, Ida Mosbech

AU - Baker, A

AU - Arneborg, Nils

AU - Jespersen, Lene

N1 - © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - UNLABELLED: The human gastrointestinal epithelium makes up the largest barrier separating the body from the external environment. Whereas invasive pathogens cause epithelial barrier disruption, probiotic micro-organisms modulate tight junction regulation and improve epithelial barrier function. In addition, probiotic strains may be able to reduce epithelial barrier disruption caused by pathogenic species. The aim of this study was to explore non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Benchmarking against established probiotic strains, we evaluated the ability of four nonpathogenic yeast species to modulate transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) across a monolayer of differentiated human colonocytes (Caco-2 cells). Further, we assessed yeast modulation of a Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier function insult. Our findings demonstrate distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function. While the established probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii increased TER across a Caco-2 monolayer by 30%, Kluyveromyces marxianus exhibited significantly stronger properties of TER enhancement (50% TER increase). In addition, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify K. marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion.SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: This study demonstrates distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Further, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify Kluyveromyces marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. This study is the first to demonstrate significant non-Saccharomyces yeast-mediated epithelial cell barrier protection from Salmonella invasion, thus encouraging future efforts aimed at confirming the observed effects in vivo and driving further strain development towards novel yeast probiotics.

AB - UNLABELLED: The human gastrointestinal epithelium makes up the largest barrier separating the body from the external environment. Whereas invasive pathogens cause epithelial barrier disruption, probiotic micro-organisms modulate tight junction regulation and improve epithelial barrier function. In addition, probiotic strains may be able to reduce epithelial barrier disruption caused by pathogenic species. The aim of this study was to explore non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Benchmarking against established probiotic strains, we evaluated the ability of four nonpathogenic yeast species to modulate transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) across a monolayer of differentiated human colonocytes (Caco-2 cells). Further, we assessed yeast modulation of a Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier function insult. Our findings demonstrate distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function. While the established probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii increased TER across a Caco-2 monolayer by 30%, Kluyveromyces marxianus exhibited significantly stronger properties of TER enhancement (50% TER increase). In addition, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify K. marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion.SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: This study demonstrates distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Further, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify Kluyveromyces marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. This study is the first to demonstrate significant non-Saccharomyces yeast-mediated epithelial cell barrier protection from Salmonella invasion, thus encouraging future efforts aimed at confirming the observed effects in vivo and driving further strain development towards novel yeast probiotics.

U2 - 10.1111/lam.12481

DO - 10.1111/lam.12481

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26280244

VL - 61

SP - 491

EP - 497

JO - Letters in Applied Microbiology

JF - Letters in Applied Microbiology

SN - 0266-8254

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 146383020