Early life treatment with vancomycin propagates Akkermansia muciniphila and reduces diabetes incidence in the NOD mouse

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Early life treatment with vancomycin propagates Akkermansia muciniphila and reduces diabetes incidence in the NOD mouse. / Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Krych, Lukasz; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Hansen, Lars H.; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Buschard, K.; Hansen, Axel Jacob Kornerup.

In: Diabetologia, Vol. 55, No. 8, 2012, p. 2285-2294.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Hansen, CHF, Krych, L, Nielsen, DS, Vogensen, FK, Hansen, LH, Sørensen, SJ, Buschard, K & Hansen, AJK 2012, 'Early life treatment with vancomycin propagates Akkermansia muciniphila and reduces diabetes incidence in the NOD mouse', Diabetologia, vol. 55, no. 8, pp. 2285-2294. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-012-2564-7

APA

Hansen, C. H. F., Krych, L., Nielsen, D. S., Vogensen, F. K., Hansen, L. H., Sørensen, S. J., ... Hansen, A. J. K. (2012). Early life treatment with vancomycin propagates Akkermansia muciniphila and reduces diabetes incidence in the NOD mouse. Diabetologia, 55(8), 2285-2294. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-012-2564-7

Vancouver

Hansen CHF, Krych L, Nielsen DS, Vogensen FK, Hansen LH, Sørensen SJ et al. Early life treatment with vancomycin propagates Akkermansia muciniphila and reduces diabetes incidence in the NOD mouse. Diabetologia. 2012;55(8):2285-2294. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-012-2564-7

Author

Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis ; Krych, Lukasz ; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris ; Vogensen, Finn Kvist ; Hansen, Lars H. ; Sørensen, Søren Johannes ; Buschard, K. ; Hansen, Axel Jacob Kornerup. / Early life treatment with vancomycin propagates Akkermansia muciniphila and reduces diabetes incidence in the NOD mouse. In: Diabetologia. 2012 ; Vol. 55, No. 8. pp. 2285-2294.

Bibtex

@article{b118b10981ad4ea7b7228f1a4cbf0f2b,
title = "Early life treatment with vancomycin propagates Akkermansia muciniphila and reduces diabetes incidence in the NOD mouse",
abstract = "Aims/hypothesis: Increasing evidence suggests that environmental factors changing the normal colonisation pattern in the gut strongly influence the risk of developing autoimmune diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate, both during infancy and adulthood, whether treatment with vancomycin, a glycopeptide antibiotic specifically directed against Gram-positive bacteria, could influence immune homeostasis and the development of diabetic symptoms in the NOD mouse model for diabetes. Methods: Accordingly, one group of mice received vancomycin from birth until weaning (day 28), while another group received vancomycin from 8 weeks of age until onset of diabetes. Pyrosequencing of the gut microbiota and flow cytometry of intestinal immune cells was used to investigate the effect of vancomycin treatment. Results: At the end of the study, the cumulative diabetes incidence was found to be significantly lower for the neonatally treated group compared with the untreated group, whereas the insulitis score and blood glucose levels were significantly lower for the mice treated as adults compared with the other groups. Mucosal inflammation was investigated by intracellular cytokine staining of the small intestinal lymphocytes, which displayed an increase in cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ T cells producing pro-inflammatory cytokines in the neonatally treated mice. Furthermore, bacteriological examination of the gut microbiota composition by pyrosequencing revealed that vancomycin depleted many major genera of Gram-positive and Gram-negative microbes while, interestingly, one single species, Akkermansia muciniphila, became dominant. Conclusions/interpretation: The early postnatal period is a critical time for microbial protection from type 1 diabetes and it is suggested that the mucolytic bacterium A. muciniphila plays a protective role in autoimmune diabetes development, particularly during infancy.",
author = "Hansen, {Camilla Hartmann Friis} and Lukasz Krych and Nielsen, {Dennis Sandris} and Vogensen, {Finn Kvist} and Hansen, {Lars H.} and S{\o}rensen, {S{\o}ren Johannes} and K. Buschard and Hansen, {Axel Jacob Kornerup}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1007/s00125-012-2564-7",
language = "Dansk",
volume = "55",
pages = "2285--2294",
journal = "Diabetologia",
issn = "0012-186X",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early life treatment with vancomycin propagates Akkermansia muciniphila and reduces diabetes incidence in the NOD mouse

AU - Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis

AU - Krych, Lukasz

AU - Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

AU - Vogensen, Finn Kvist

AU - Hansen, Lars H.

AU - Sørensen, Søren Johannes

AU - Buschard, K.

AU - Hansen, Axel Jacob Kornerup

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Aims/hypothesis: Increasing evidence suggests that environmental factors changing the normal colonisation pattern in the gut strongly influence the risk of developing autoimmune diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate, both during infancy and adulthood, whether treatment with vancomycin, a glycopeptide antibiotic specifically directed against Gram-positive bacteria, could influence immune homeostasis and the development of diabetic symptoms in the NOD mouse model for diabetes. Methods: Accordingly, one group of mice received vancomycin from birth until weaning (day 28), while another group received vancomycin from 8 weeks of age until onset of diabetes. Pyrosequencing of the gut microbiota and flow cytometry of intestinal immune cells was used to investigate the effect of vancomycin treatment. Results: At the end of the study, the cumulative diabetes incidence was found to be significantly lower for the neonatally treated group compared with the untreated group, whereas the insulitis score and blood glucose levels were significantly lower for the mice treated as adults compared with the other groups. Mucosal inflammation was investigated by intracellular cytokine staining of the small intestinal lymphocytes, which displayed an increase in cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ T cells producing pro-inflammatory cytokines in the neonatally treated mice. Furthermore, bacteriological examination of the gut microbiota composition by pyrosequencing revealed that vancomycin depleted many major genera of Gram-positive and Gram-negative microbes while, interestingly, one single species, Akkermansia muciniphila, became dominant. Conclusions/interpretation: The early postnatal period is a critical time for microbial protection from type 1 diabetes and it is suggested that the mucolytic bacterium A. muciniphila plays a protective role in autoimmune diabetes development, particularly during infancy.

AB - Aims/hypothesis: Increasing evidence suggests that environmental factors changing the normal colonisation pattern in the gut strongly influence the risk of developing autoimmune diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate, both during infancy and adulthood, whether treatment with vancomycin, a glycopeptide antibiotic specifically directed against Gram-positive bacteria, could influence immune homeostasis and the development of diabetic symptoms in the NOD mouse model for diabetes. Methods: Accordingly, one group of mice received vancomycin from birth until weaning (day 28), while another group received vancomycin from 8 weeks of age until onset of diabetes. Pyrosequencing of the gut microbiota and flow cytometry of intestinal immune cells was used to investigate the effect of vancomycin treatment. Results: At the end of the study, the cumulative diabetes incidence was found to be significantly lower for the neonatally treated group compared with the untreated group, whereas the insulitis score and blood glucose levels were significantly lower for the mice treated as adults compared with the other groups. Mucosal inflammation was investigated by intracellular cytokine staining of the small intestinal lymphocytes, which displayed an increase in cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ T cells producing pro-inflammatory cytokines in the neonatally treated mice. Furthermore, bacteriological examination of the gut microbiota composition by pyrosequencing revealed that vancomycin depleted many major genera of Gram-positive and Gram-negative microbes while, interestingly, one single species, Akkermansia muciniphila, became dominant. Conclusions/interpretation: The early postnatal period is a critical time for microbial protection from type 1 diabetes and it is suggested that the mucolytic bacterium A. muciniphila plays a protective role in autoimmune diabetes development, particularly during infancy.

U2 - 10.1007/s00125-012-2564-7

DO - 10.1007/s00125-012-2564-7

M3 - Tidsskriftartikel

C2 - 22572803

VL - 55

SP - 2285

EP - 2294

JO - Diabetologia

JF - Diabetologia

SN - 0012-186X

IS - 8

ER -

ID: 38118326