Is reducing appetite beneficial for body weight management in the context of overweight and obesity? A systematic review and meta‐analysis from clinical trials assessing body weight management after exposure to satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing products

Research output: Contribution to journalReview

Standard

Is reducing appetite beneficial for body weight management in the context of overweight and obesity? A systematic review and meta‐analysis from clinical trials assessing body weight management after exposure to satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing products. / Hansen, Thea Toft; Andersen, Sarah Vold; Astrup, Arne; Blundell, John E; Sjödin, Anders Mikael.

In: Obesity Reviews, Vol. 20, No. 7, 2019, p. 983-997.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview

Harvard

Hansen, TT, Andersen, SV, Astrup, A, Blundell, JE & Sjödin, AM 2019, 'Is reducing appetite beneficial for body weight management in the context of overweight and obesity? A systematic review and meta‐analysis from clinical trials assessing body weight management after exposure to satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing products', Obesity Reviews, vol. 20, no. 7, pp. 983-997. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12854

APA

Hansen, T. T., Andersen, S. V., Astrup, A., Blundell, J. E., & Sjödin, A. M. (2019). Is reducing appetite beneficial for body weight management in the context of overweight and obesity? A systematic review and meta‐analysis from clinical trials assessing body weight management after exposure to satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing products. Obesity Reviews, 20(7), 983-997. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12854

Vancouver

Hansen TT, Andersen SV, Astrup A, Blundell JE, Sjödin AM. Is reducing appetite beneficial for body weight management in the context of overweight and obesity? A systematic review and meta‐analysis from clinical trials assessing body weight management after exposure to satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing products. Obesity Reviews. 2019;20(7):983-997. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12854

Author

Hansen, Thea Toft ; Andersen, Sarah Vold ; Astrup, Arne ; Blundell, John E ; Sjödin, Anders Mikael. / Is reducing appetite beneficial for body weight management in the context of overweight and obesity? A systematic review and meta‐analysis from clinical trials assessing body weight management after exposure to satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing products. In: Obesity Reviews. 2019 ; Vol. 20, No. 7. pp. 983-997.

Bibtex

@article{690591f3a4484044bef24cf854e0fb16,
title = "Is reducing appetite beneficial for body weight management in the context of overweight and obesity? A systematic review and meta‐analysis from clinical trials assessing body weight management after exposure to satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing products",
abstract = "This review aims to investigate whether interventions that enhance satiety and/or reduce hunger lead to beneficial effects on body weight management in the context of overweight and obesity. A comprehensive review protocol was prepared before conducting a systematic search in PubMed identifying 517 papers with 12 meeting the inclusion criteria. A thorough risk of bias assessment was performed based on the Cochrane collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. Based on a meta‐analysis, the average of 75 subjects exposed to satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing foods during more than 8 weeks coincidently reduced their body weight by 3.60 (1.05; 6.15) kg (mean (95{\%} confidence interval)) more compared with controls. Two studies analysed whether individual reductions in appetite were associated with body weight. Decreased ad libitum energy intake after exposure to the satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing interventions explained 58{\%} (P < 0.001) and 23{\%} (P < 0.001) of the variations in the subsequent weight losses over 12 and 8 weeks, respectively. Robust acute effects on appetite were found equally likely to be linked to improved body weight management as sustained effects. Satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing interventions are supported to improve body weight management, but studies specifically designed to demonstrate a causal link remain needed.",
keywords = "Faculty of Science, Body weight control, Food innovation, Hunger, Satiety, Weight loss",
author = "Hansen, {Thea Toft} and Andersen, {Sarah Vold} and Arne Astrup and Blundell, {John E} and Sj{\"o}din, {Anders Mikael}",
note = "CURIS 2019 NEXS 113",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1111/obr.12854",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "983--997",
journal = "Obesity Reviews",
issn = "1467-7881",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is reducing appetite beneficial for body weight management in the context of overweight and obesity? A systematic review and meta‐analysis from clinical trials assessing body weight management after exposure to satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing products

AU - Hansen, Thea Toft

AU - Andersen, Sarah Vold

AU - Astrup, Arne

AU - Blundell, John E

AU - Sjödin, Anders Mikael

N1 - CURIS 2019 NEXS 113

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - This review aims to investigate whether interventions that enhance satiety and/or reduce hunger lead to beneficial effects on body weight management in the context of overweight and obesity. A comprehensive review protocol was prepared before conducting a systematic search in PubMed identifying 517 papers with 12 meeting the inclusion criteria. A thorough risk of bias assessment was performed based on the Cochrane collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. Based on a meta‐analysis, the average of 75 subjects exposed to satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing foods during more than 8 weeks coincidently reduced their body weight by 3.60 (1.05; 6.15) kg (mean (95% confidence interval)) more compared with controls. Two studies analysed whether individual reductions in appetite were associated with body weight. Decreased ad libitum energy intake after exposure to the satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing interventions explained 58% (P < 0.001) and 23% (P < 0.001) of the variations in the subsequent weight losses over 12 and 8 weeks, respectively. Robust acute effects on appetite were found equally likely to be linked to improved body weight management as sustained effects. Satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing interventions are supported to improve body weight management, but studies specifically designed to demonstrate a causal link remain needed.

AB - This review aims to investigate whether interventions that enhance satiety and/or reduce hunger lead to beneficial effects on body weight management in the context of overweight and obesity. A comprehensive review protocol was prepared before conducting a systematic search in PubMed identifying 517 papers with 12 meeting the inclusion criteria. A thorough risk of bias assessment was performed based on the Cochrane collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. Based on a meta‐analysis, the average of 75 subjects exposed to satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing foods during more than 8 weeks coincidently reduced their body weight by 3.60 (1.05; 6.15) kg (mean (95% confidence interval)) more compared with controls. Two studies analysed whether individual reductions in appetite were associated with body weight. Decreased ad libitum energy intake after exposure to the satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing interventions explained 58% (P < 0.001) and 23% (P < 0.001) of the variations in the subsequent weight losses over 12 and 8 weeks, respectively. Robust acute effects on appetite were found equally likely to be linked to improved body weight management as sustained effects. Satiety enhancing and/or hunger reducing interventions are supported to improve body weight management, but studies specifically designed to demonstrate a causal link remain needed.

KW - Faculty of Science

KW - Body weight control

KW - Food innovation

KW - Hunger

KW - Satiety

KW - Weight loss

U2 - 10.1111/obr.12854

DO - 10.1111/obr.12854

M3 - Review

C2 - 30945414

VL - 20

SP - 983

EP - 997

JO - Obesity Reviews

JF - Obesity Reviews

SN - 1467-7881

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 215977276