Staff of the Department of Food Science – University of Copenhagen

Changing children's eating behaviour - A review of experimental research

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

Standard

Changing children's eating behaviour - A review of experimental research. / DeCosta, Patricia Enebær Irene; Møller, Per; Frøst, Michael Bom; Olsen, Annemarie.

In: Appetite, Vol. 113, 2017, p. 327-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

Harvard

DeCosta, PEI, Møller, P, Frøst, MB & Olsen, A 2017, 'Changing children's eating behaviour - A review of experimental research' Appetite, vol. 113, pp. 327-357. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2017.03.004

APA

DeCosta, P. E. I., Møller, P., Frøst, M. B., & Olsen, A. (2017). Changing children's eating behaviour - A review of experimental research. Appetite, 113, 327-357. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2017.03.004

Vancouver

DeCosta PEI, Møller P, Frøst MB, Olsen A. Changing children's eating behaviour - A review of experimental research. Appetite. 2017;113:327-357. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2017.03.004

Author

DeCosta, Patricia Enebær Irene ; Møller, Per ; Frøst, Michael Bom ; Olsen, Annemarie. / Changing children's eating behaviour - A review of experimental research. In: Appetite. 2017 ; Vol. 113. pp. 327-357.

Bibtex

@article{509b037f821c46cda627a74d5df6f8ea,
title = "Changing children's eating behaviour - A review of experimental research",
abstract = "The interest in children's eating behaviours and how to change them has been growing in recent years. This review examines the following questions: What strategies have been used to change children's eating behaviours? Have their effects been experimentally demonstrated? And, are the effects transient or enduring? Medline and Cab abstract (Ovid) and Web of Science (Thomson Reuters) were used to identify the experimental studies. A total of 120 experimental studies were identified and they are presented grouped within these 11 topics; parental control, reward, social facilitation, cooking programs, school gardens, sensory education, availability and accessibility, choice architecture and nudging, branding and food packaging, preparation and serving style, and offering a choice. In conclusion, controlling strategies for changing children's eating behaviour in a positive direction appear to be counterproductive. Hands-on approaches such as gardening and cooking programs may encourage greater vegetable consumption and may have a larger effect compared to nutrition education. Providing children with free, accessible fruits and vegetables have been experimentally shown to positively affect long-term eating behaviour. The authors recommend future research to examine how taste and palatability can positively affect children's attitudes and eating behaviour",
author = "DeCosta, {Patricia Eneb{\ae}r Irene} and Per M{\o}ller and Fr{\o}st, {Michael Bom} and Annemarie Olsen",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.appet.2017.03.004",
language = "English",
volume = "113",
pages = "327--357",
journal = "Appetite",
issn = "0195-6663",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Changing children's eating behaviour - A review of experimental research

AU - DeCosta, Patricia Enebær Irene

AU - Møller, Per

AU - Frøst, Michael Bom

AU - Olsen, Annemarie

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - The interest in children's eating behaviours and how to change them has been growing in recent years. This review examines the following questions: What strategies have been used to change children's eating behaviours? Have their effects been experimentally demonstrated? And, are the effects transient or enduring? Medline and Cab abstract (Ovid) and Web of Science (Thomson Reuters) were used to identify the experimental studies. A total of 120 experimental studies were identified and they are presented grouped within these 11 topics; parental control, reward, social facilitation, cooking programs, school gardens, sensory education, availability and accessibility, choice architecture and nudging, branding and food packaging, preparation and serving style, and offering a choice. In conclusion, controlling strategies for changing children's eating behaviour in a positive direction appear to be counterproductive. Hands-on approaches such as gardening and cooking programs may encourage greater vegetable consumption and may have a larger effect compared to nutrition education. Providing children with free, accessible fruits and vegetables have been experimentally shown to positively affect long-term eating behaviour. The authors recommend future research to examine how taste and palatability can positively affect children's attitudes and eating behaviour

AB - The interest in children's eating behaviours and how to change them has been growing in recent years. This review examines the following questions: What strategies have been used to change children's eating behaviours? Have their effects been experimentally demonstrated? And, are the effects transient or enduring? Medline and Cab abstract (Ovid) and Web of Science (Thomson Reuters) were used to identify the experimental studies. A total of 120 experimental studies were identified and they are presented grouped within these 11 topics; parental control, reward, social facilitation, cooking programs, school gardens, sensory education, availability and accessibility, choice architecture and nudging, branding and food packaging, preparation and serving style, and offering a choice. In conclusion, controlling strategies for changing children's eating behaviour in a positive direction appear to be counterproductive. Hands-on approaches such as gardening and cooking programs may encourage greater vegetable consumption and may have a larger effect compared to nutrition education. Providing children with free, accessible fruits and vegetables have been experimentally shown to positively affect long-term eating behaviour. The authors recommend future research to examine how taste and palatability can positively affect children's attitudes and eating behaviour

U2 - 10.1016/j.appet.2017.03.004

DO - 10.1016/j.appet.2017.03.004

M3 - Review

VL - 113

SP - 327

EP - 357

JO - Appetite

JF - Appetite

SN - 0195-6663

ER -

ID: 174396306